Mark Mynheir’s “The Corruptible” – A Flawed PI, Dirty Deeds, and A Story of Redemption

Just like some things in life, this book is worth the time and the perseverance.  That’s what you need to know when you start to read  Mark Mynheir’s “The Corruptible.”

The first scene  starts out with a goon, a gun, and a fight.  It is CSI-exciting and introduces you to Ray Quinn, private investigator, who is at the wrong end of the fight.  Quinn is then saved by his partner, Crevis, and the story begins.

Quinn, slightly disabled from being injured on his last job, is hired to locate a missing hard drive from the mysterious Armon Mayer, CEO of Mayer Holdings.  It seems that somebody on the inside at Mayer Holdings has downloaded sensitive financial data and it could bring the whole company down.

When the case leads to finding a ex-cop-gone-bad named Logan dead in a hotel room, who Ray worked with at the Orlando Police Department, the stakes rise.  The book then introduces a myriad of characters, each of which have varying level of ethics and impact on the story.

Frankly, after the opening scene,  it did take a few chapters for me to engage with all the characters of The Corruptible.  The writing is solid, the characters are well developed, but the pace was a bit slow to start.

As the story unfolds we learn about Ray Quinn fighting his alcohol demons, Crevis attempting to learn to read and take the police test, and their ever present and gracious friend, Pam, gentling rebuking or encouraging Ray and Crevis to be their best.

There are enough twists and turns in the story to keep you on your toes and guessing about what comes next.   More importantly, the pace picks up significantly in the middle of the book and doesn’t slow down until the end of the book.

Mark Mynheir’s “The Corruptible” is a refreshing addition to any Christian Fiction library.

 

FULL DISCLOSURE

I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.

About Richard Brashear

I talk about faith, technology, social media, and culture in our ministries. Richard can be followed on Twitter at @RichardBrashear